Thankfulness

Count your blessings. Look on the bright side. See the glass as half full. Just be happy. It’s easy to offer platitudes to our fellow travelers, whether they’re going through serious difficulties or just the normal ups and downs of life. I have to admit, I often get annoyed by these overly optimistic people. We can see the world as bright and sunny, but that doesn’t make the rain stop falling.

But I still believe that offering up thanks is a good way to live. If we focus too much on the negative, it’s like staring at the object on the side of the road we want to avoid. It just makes us steer towards it.

So, with our American Thanksgiving just two days away, I offer up thanks, to my family, my friends, my readers, my fellow writers and bloggers, and to the creative goddesses that push me forward, even when I’ve lost my creative energy.

To all of you, Happy Thanksgiving!

thanksgiving-turkey-clip-art-clipart Kelee

10 Questions to Ask Before Signing with a Small Press Publisher (Part Two)

Some more excellent words of wisdom about small publishers.

Writers After Dark

The future of traditional publishing may lie in the hands of small press publishers. Their ability to be creative, adaptive, and flexible offers many advantages over the larger houses but as we discussed in Part One of this article, selecting a small press publisher requires some homework.

For an author, nothing is worse than seemingly reaching that publishing dream only to discover their publisher isn’t who you thought they were. Although there is no perfect system and no guarantees, any author considering the small press alternative should, at a minimum, investigate these ten areas before signing a contract.

6. What are their goals and objectives? Many small press publishing companies are owned and operated by a self-published author. It’s smart marketing and good business. Your books are more likely to be purchased by a bookstore if the publisher is listed as a company rather than under the author’s name.

The…

View original post 987 more words

10 Questions to Ask Before Signing with a Small Press Publisher (Part One)

Every writer should read this. It’s easy to get excited about someone wanting to publish your work. But excitement too often leads to blindness.

Writers After Dark

Small press publishing has become a significant cottage industry. Self-publishing changed the book industry’s dynamics, and as many of the large traditional publishers struggled to make profits and maintain relevance, many entrepreneurs saw an opportunity to fill a void. Not burdened by high overhead or restricted by antiquated publishing practices, small press companies have the benefits of agility and flexibility.

For many authors, a small press publishing contract offers a nice “middle ground” between being on their own as an Indie author and the long, often pointless process of courting a major publisher. Understandably, a book contract offers both excitement and a sense of “approval” or acceptance. In short, for some writers, “I’ve been published” feels more legitimate than “I’ve published.” And for those authors not interested in learning about marketing, publishing, sales, editing services, and all the other mechanics that make up “publishing,” a small press can alleviate the…

View original post 1,057 more words

When Life Gives You a Dystopian Novel

It seems I’m going to write about politics for the second time on this blog. I never imagined my country would embrace demagoguery and hate. I haven’t been able to sleep the last couple of nights. Last night I got up and watched The Devil and Miss Jones, a delightful Jean Arthur comedy. I couldn’t help noticing that it was made in 1941, when darkness had descended on Europe and Asia. Then, America was the last best hope of freedom-loving people. Now where does that hope lie?

 

I’ve always been a fan of dystopian fiction. Little did I imagine I’d be living it. I was thinking about three of my favorite dystopian novels, Fahrenheit 451, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Hunger Games. They all feature young women who appear powerless against the dark forces in their societies. The heroines find the strength and resilience through their own courage and through their relationships with others. Entering these dark days, I plan to use them as role models. Hopefully, we’ll all emerge into the light as stronger and better people.

Kelee